British and French leaders defend Syria strikes

British Prime Minister Theresa May defended airstrikes on Syria in parliament on Monday (April 16).

It may have been "Mission Accomplished" for Donald Trump but for Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron - his partners in the airstrikes on Syria at the weekend - there's still questions to be answered back home.

The British prime minister faced scrutiny from lawmakers on Monday (April 16), some of whom are angry that she didn't seek parliamentary approval before ordering military action.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) UK OPPOSITION LEADER JEREMY CORBYN, SAYING:

"The prime minister is accountable to this parliament not to the whims of the U.S. president "

May said she did not seek a green light from parliament because of the need to act quickly in the wake of the suspected chemical weapons attack by the Syrian government in Douma on April 7.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) BRITISH PRIME MINISTER, THERESA MAY, SAYING:

"We have not done this because President Trump asked us to do so. We have done it because we believed it was the right thing to do and we are not alone."

In France the Conservatives, the far left and the far-right have all criticized the strikes.

The French constitution bars presidents from going to parliament, so it was Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, not President Macron, facing questions.

He told French lawmakers the strikes had been targeted to avoid both harming civilians and escalating the conflict.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has warned of global 'chaos' if the West hits Syria again.

A Kremlin statement said the strikes violated the UN charter.



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Source: Times of Oman, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FgjVr4D32U